safefood Knowledge Network 's Posts (121)

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Over 2,772 consumer complaints were handled by the Food Safety Authority of Ireland’s (FSAI) Advice Line in 2020, with 34% of complaints relating to unfit food and 30% to poor hygiene standards. Overall, the 2020 complaints saw a decrease on the 3,460 complaints reported in 2019. The reduction in numbers largely reflects the impact of COVID-19, where many food service businesses were temporarily closed for long periods throughout the year. All complaints received by the FSAI in 2020 were followed up and investigated by food inspectors throughout the country.

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Adequate surveillance programs for most foodborne parasites in Europe are lacking, according to a recently published study.

Researchers found although human and animal data are available for five selected parasites, the surveillance and reporting requirements vary among and within regions and countries, and among national experts and European bodies.

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The Food Standards Agency (FSA) along with Food Standards Scotland (FSS) and Public Health England (PHE), Public Health Scotland and Public Health Wales are reminding people once again to take care when handling and cooking frozen raw breaded chicken products at home, such as nuggets, goujons, dippers, poppers and kievs.

 

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There is low awareness of Campylobacter and its impact despite it being the main cause of food poisoning in the UK, according to a project on how people perceive food-related risks.

Results come from a survey by Kantar Public and analysis at the Food Standards Agency (FSA). The study was online and had 1,194 participants in March 2017 but results were only published this month.

 

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A non-profit group has added its voice to a chorus of growing safety concerns about the rise in businesses operating out of people’s homes.

The Natasha Allergy Research Foundation said urgent government intervention on food safety standards is required to deal with the subject that has gained increased attention during the coronavirus pandemic.

 

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New research conducted at North Carolina State University reveals that two of the most common strains of Campylobacter are exchanging genetic material. That means they are producing more infectious and antibiotic-resistant strains. And that is bad news for consumers, since those strains are common in the poultry industry.

 

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Scientists have determined how harmless E. coli gut bacteria in chickens can pick up the genes required to evolve and cause infections in poultry and people.

Colibacillosis caused by avian pathogenic E. coli (APEC) is the most common infection in chickens reared for meat or eggs. It is fatal in up to 20 percent of cases and causes multi-million pound losses in the poultry industry. Other problems include increasing antibiotic resistance and the risk of human infections, according to the research report.

 

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The COVID-19 pandemic has wreaked havoc on the restaurant industry, but it hasn’t ended it. Thanks to quick reactions and a willingness to adjust, establishments of all sizes, locations and niches have managed to stay afloat. With more restaurants reopening, it’s become clear that some of these changes will last.

Amid the chaos of COVID-19, restaurants adapted because they had to. As 110,000 establishments closed permanently, the industry quickly learned that it must adapt to survive. Now that the sector’s lived with these adjustments for some time, their long-term potential is more apparent.

 

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Stricter labeling rules on certain food products in Scotland will apply beginning later this year.

The legislation requires businesses to include the product name and a full ingredients list, including allergen information, on foods classified as pre-packed for direct sale (PPDS). Current rules allow allergen information to be provided by any means including verbally by staff.

 

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An analysis of more than 1,000 ready-to-eat (RTE) spreads and dips in Ireland has found the majority free from contamination.

The Food Safety Authority of Ireland (FSAI) survey investigated the prevalence of Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella, Campylobacter, Enterobacteriaceae, and E. coli, which is an indicator of fecal contamination, in refrigerated RTE spreads and dips such as hummus, guacamole and meat and fish pâtés.

 

Survey of the Microbiological Safety of Refrigerated Ready-to-eat (RTE) Spreads and Dips.pdf

 

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Food systems lie at the intersection of the many critical challenges facing us today: from fighting climate change, to halting biodiversity loss to reducing waste.

Meeting such challenges requires urgent action, as set out in the objectives for a sustainable future at the heart of the UN Development Goals and the European Commission’s Green Deal. EFSA is committed to supporting these objectives in cooperation with other EU agencies, Member States and international partners.

 

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Thcontinue readingUSDA publishes estimates of how much foodborne illness costs Americans.  It does this for 15 pathogens, one at a time:

The Cost Estimates of Foodborne Illnesses data product provides detailed data about the costs of major foodborne illnesses in the United States, updating and extending previous ERS research. This data set includes the following:

  • Detailed identification of specific disease outcomes for foodborne infections caused by 15 major pathogens in the United States
  • Associated outpatient and inpatient expenditures on medical care
  • Associated lost wages
  • Estimates of individuals’ willingness to pay to reduce mortality resulting from these foodborne illnesses acquired in the United States.

If you click on the links below, you get an Excel spreadsheet.

I clicked on Salmonella (non-typhoidal); the estimate for its costs in 2018 is basically $4 billion ($4, 142,179.161).

It would be really nice if USDA’s Economic Research Service would add these all up for us, but it’s short staffed (remember the forced move of the agency to Kansas City that I complained about so much last year.

But foodborne illness costs a lot, in health care costs, lost work and productivity, and all the other bad things that happen when people get sick.

It’s best to do everything possible to prevent foodborne illness before it occurs.

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Results of a study on parasites in fish supports a change to European regulation, according to researchers.

Their work found a low risk of Anisakis larvae infection in fish products from European mariculture activities. Mariculture, a type of aquaculture, involves food production for human consumption in marine environments.

The increasing demand for raw or undercooked fish products, supplied by aquaculture and fisheries, raises concerns about the risk of zoonotic fish parasites, according to the study’s authors. Anisakiasis, which is caused by nematode larvae belonging to Anisakis genus in the marine environment, is considered the main threat to human health.

 

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The FSAI is committed to creating an environment of openness and transparency. This public consultation process allows for those who may be affected by proposed changes to food safety legislation or who have an interest in the legislation, to contribute their views.

The majority of food safety legislation in Ireland originates from the European Union. All proposals from the EU that are relevant to food safety will be available here and all interested parties can submit their views on the possible impact of the proposals.

 

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A permanent position based in our Cork office.

 

safefood is an all-island implementation body set up under the British-Irish Agreement with a general remit to promote awareness and knowledge of food safety and nutrition issues on the island of Ireland. Our activities include:

  • Promotion of food safety
  • Research into food safety
  • Communication of nutritional advice
  • Promotion of scientific co-operation and laboratory linkages
  • Provision of independent scientific advice

Click here for more information

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The Marine Institute continues to invest in the next generation of ocean professionals, through the 2021 Summer Bursary Scholarship Programme, which provides third level students with work experience across a number of marine areas.

Our Bursary Scholarship Programme has been running for more than 30 years, providing essential career development and support, and inspiring the next generation of marine scientists and experts. The programme equips students with the skills to become ocean leaders and marine champions of the future, and is a key initiative of the Marine Institute's new Strategic Plan 2018-2022: Building Ocean Knowledge, Delivering Ocean Services.

 

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The Food Safety Authority of Ireland (FSAI) today reported that two Closure Orders were served on food businesses during the month of January for breaches of food safety legislation, pursuant to the FSAI Act, 1998 and the European Union (Official Controls in Relation to Food Legislation) Regulations, 2020. The Closure Orders were issued by officers of the FSAI.

 

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A significant proportion of listeriosis cases in Germany are caused by eating smoked or cured salmon products, according to the Robert Koch-Institut (RKI).

A total of 22 cross-federal state outbreaks of listeriosis have evidence pointing to smoked or cured salmon products as the cause of infections. This includes 15 illnesses from 2010 to 2015 and 41 in both 2019 and 2020.

 

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